2009-05-14 / Obituaries

Philip "Bucky" Presti

Philip "Bucky" Presti, a 38 year resident of Putnam Lake, NY, died Saturday May 9, 2009, at the age of 78.

Mr. Presti was born April 6, 1931 in New York City, son of the late Frank and Adeline (DeFini) Presti. He married his childhood sweetheart Carole Viscusi, to whom he was married for 54 years. Mr. Presti was a carpenter for the New York City Board of Education for 30 years, retiring in 1992. While living in New York City, he was a scoutmaster, and an avid volleyball player.

After moving to Putnam Lake in 1971 he became an active member of the First Baptist Church of Brewster, where he taught Sunday School, and also pitched for the church softball team. He was a good neighbor to all, helping friends and family with home improvement projects, sharing the bountiful harvest from his vegetable garden, and volunteering for Habitat for Humanity.

In addition to his wife, Mr. Presti is survived by four children: Jeanne Scigliano and her husband Bob of Pawling, NY; Philip Presti and his wife Nancy of Madison, CT; Judy Gross and her husband Peter of Sterling, VA; and Holly Whiting and her husband Joe of Hamden, CT, and nine grandchildren: Kristin, Bethany, Lauralynn, Caroline, Courtney, David, Natalie, Thomas and Adrienne. He is also survived by three brothers: Frank Presti of Saugerties, NY; Joe Presti of Massapequa, NY; and Robert Presti of Long Island City, NY, as well as many nieces and nephews.

Calling hours were held at Beecher Funeral Home, 1 Putnam Avenue, Brewster, NY on Wednesday, May 13, 2009 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral services will be held on Thursday, May 14, 2009 at the First Baptist Church of Brewster, in Brewster, NY at 11 a.m. Interment will private. Donations in his memory may be made to The Trustees of Columbia University, Taub Institute for Lewy Body Research , 630 West 168th St., Box 16, NY, NY 10032.

Return to top

Click here for digital edition
2009-05-14 digital edition

Weekly Quotation

“What is written is written and the finger of time having writ moves on.” ~The Cold Spring Recorder, Dec. 10, 1937